WELCOME TO THE NORTH

Whilst out walking his dog, Joe discovers an unconscious woman out in the woods. He takes her back to his place and she comes around claiming she can’t remember anything. Joe’s intrigue for the woman grows out of the circumstances he found her in and he sets out to protect her when a couple of heavies turn up asking questions. Add some bent cops and a heap of hallucinogenics into the mix and you’ve got a violent, comic tale of crime and survival.

DARK, GRITTY AND MYSTERIOUS 

Jack Grewar, Director/Writer

My ambition for Northern Fall is to create a dark and mysterious environment in which the characters, each holding their own secrets and motivations, ultimately clash, leading to an exciting climax. Thematically it’s explores masculinity and the similarities and differences between men in a world of crime and obsession. Each character is pursuing either money, morality or both. Visual influences for the movie include the work of David Fincher and Nicolas Winding Refn.

PRODUCTION TEAM

ASTOR PRODUCTIONS

ASTOR PRODUCTIONS

Production Team

Kris Bilski is the director of local film production company Astor Productions. Astor provide unrivalled technical support from cinematography, sound, editing and visual effects.

JACK GREWAR

JACK GREWAR

Writer/Director

Is a film maker from Hull. After studying film in the USA, he returned to Hull and assembled a team of creatives to start work on his screenplay ‘Northern Fall’ Jack’s last short film ‘Revolt’ is currently on the film festival circuit.

MONIQUE NAGRA

MONIQUE NAGRA

Picturehouse26 / Producer

Is an awards nominated film maker from Hull. On completion of film studies in London, Monique returned to Hull & established Picturehouse 26. Her last short film ‘Chester’ has been nominated for best short film at The Anchorage International Film Festival, The Fargo Film Festival & The L.A International Women’s Film Festival.

DONATION PERKS

UPDATES

An Interview with Hull Film Maker, Jack Grewar

An Interview with Hull Film Maker, Jack Grewar

Tell me about your time in the New York film school?

So in 2011, after being a film buff for so long of course meant that I’d always read Empire magazine, which had this full page ad every month dedicated to the New York film academy, I’d always just skim passed it, but one day by chance on my lunch break whilst I was working on a script I must have just read the full advert, realising what it actually was whilst I was, after reading that I just kind of thought “screw it” I had no major ties at the time holding me back, no massive commitments and just made it happen, that day I applied to the email address at the bottom which got the ball rolling, then 18 months and lots of money and paper work later, I was there.

What was the biggest thing that you took away from that process?

I realised that it really was something I wanted to do for the rest of my life. At first it was all new and overwhelming, not knowing quite what you’re doing, but you pick things up from people from all their different skill levels, but one thing that I really took away from it was that there’s so many ways things can get done, but all that matters at the end of the day is to tell the best story that you possibly can and it’s just about making that happen with whatever resources you have at the time to do it. I worked with a few different crews and teams and it really is just applying your own style and methods to things and nurturing others too really.

What is the story of Northern Fall, how did the project start?

 I made a short film in 2016 called Revolt, during the making of that film I met a bunch of super talented people, cast and crew, which included Kris Bilski from Astor Productions, Monique Nagra, an actor called Claudia Soyer, a great bunch of people, and after working with them on revolt and working well together I started getting ideas for a feature film obviously whilst I was out shooting in Hull I was getting ideas and these great specific locations during that shoot I was getting inspiration for another story. It’s in the same vein as it’s a crime thriller, and it was at that point when I started the ball rolling, shortly after editing revolt I started writing the script, which itself is inspired by Coen brothers, it’s got ideas of dark noir, darkly comic and in the vein of Fargo.

How did you get into the mind-set for something like that?

I guess in the past I’ve just watched a lot of crime thrillers, it’s my favourite genre of film, so, I just find the whole genre has so much scope to be cinematic and entertaining, the film Se7en for example, the film Fargo, Fight club, these dark atmospheric gritty thrillers, to me they have a lot more cinematic qualities than a comedy for example, I just love.

Making a film that just entertains people was always the bottom line for me really, that’s why people watch movies at the end of the day. A lot of films these days are getting more caught up in trying to be philosophical than anything else, if I can just get the audience to watch it to the end I think I’ll have succeeded and have a great time along the way taking a trip to the North.

The film itself creates a dark violent world. There are still underlying themes of course as with any great story. Northern Fall can really be summarised by the idea of how addiction and obsession can either churn you out in one piece or destroyed and the mental struggle that they go through. There isn’t really a stereotypical lead and a stereotypical bad guy in this movie with all its characters, I think everyone is in the middle caught up in their obsessions, whether it’s affluence or morality and the story is about how far they’ll go to get what they want.

What were the inspirations for the film?

I guess one of the characters, the lead male Joe, I really wanted to create an antihero, he’s got a dark past but remains a family man, he’s a good bloke but he’s done bad things in his time with still the possibility of him going back to prison. He leads this life of crime but his motivations lie with his daughter and less for greed. Once he meets the lead character of Erica he becomes almost obsessed with her, there’s a real passion between the two, dancing on a fine line. In terms of style my films are visually influenced by the work of Michael Mann, David Fincher and Nicolas Winding Refn, with my some of my top films being ’Heat’, ’Fight Club’ and ’The Neon Demon’

Music is a massive inspiration, I create a soundtrack for each movie during the writing process, which is then shared with the production crew and cast to establish the tone. Massive Attack, Portishead, The Dead Weather and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club have been the recent inspirations for story and character developments.

Is Joe someone who you’d daydream about being?

I guess so yeah, he’s a man’s man, he’s the kind of guy you want to be. In terms of references Ryan Gosling’s character in Drive being that perfect silent but deadly type, he’s cool, good looking, he can say a thousand things with just one look, but you know he cares for this woman and child, but still just has something underneath him, that violence that will occasionally show itself with these outbursts. Again, just the idea of that antihero.

What have been the hardest points for you int terms of the writing process? Especially in Hull where it’s certainly not been done before?

So, I guess I started with the location of Hull which I always knew I was going to be setting it in, which immediately gave me so much inspiration for. It’s just so great for shooting with its mixture of interesting urban and rural locations, I love rural locations like forests that suits this style, it’s a nice contrast for the characters to be so isolated in the woods where they should be feeling more open and then suddenly feel more freedom when they’re back in the city, just showing the kind of environment that these characters thrive in. Location plays a major part in the film, whilst using the vibrancy of Hull to add another dynamic.

Because Hull is quite tight knit I know quite a lot of people who own bars and great locations that would let me shoot in. The campaign combined with other fundraising events have raised a few grand of our 25K budget. Right now, we’re approaching local businesses in Hull with investment and sponsorship opportunities. We’ve already made arrangements with local bars, clubs, restaurants, factories and food stores for the shoot.

How do you want the audience to come out of the film? What kind of emotions can you expect them to come through

There’s an intensity to the film, but I really want the audience to develop almost a relationship to the characters that kind of reflect themselves in some way or another, I believe everyone will empathise with at least one of the characters as each one of them kind of whispers and tugs at everyone’s individual darker sides.

What have you thought about the process so far about starting a short film in hull?

 From my own personal experience the worst sort of semi mistake I’ve made so far is not obtaining the right permissions to film in certain places. I’m all for guerrilla and indie film making, I like finding those rustic warehouses to shoot in for authenticity. But on one occasion the police turned up because of a member of public turning up after seeing a firearm and panicking, even though it was just a replica for the sake of the shoot, fortunately it was the last shot of the day but I thought to myself it would have ruined the shoot and cost even more money. But even then, that mistake ended up being great for the project as it got some great publicity in the news so it worked in that manner but I would say it’s all about planning with this sort of thing, preparation is key, and factoring in a buffer zone for any mistakes that might have been made, back up plans for back up plans and be able to make decisions on the spot.

 

What kind of risks have you taken with pursuing Northern Fall?

To be honest I’m anxious about everything! Because it’s a feature there’s that many elements to it it’s almost like where you begin, the full project of northern fall is going to involve 70 people cast and crew, and with being director, producer and writer I’ll be touching and deciding on every factor. I try not to over think it because you can just end up having a heart attack and have decision paralysis. It’s just about doing something that gets you step by step even further towards completion and getting yourself out there.

What’s been the most beneficial so far in the process in terms of speeding up the process or making it easier for you?

First, I would say that because I had already made Revolt in 2016 the cast and crew I assembled on that project worked so well together, I knew that I could use everyone on that project on Northern Fall which got the ball rolling. The relationship I’ve developed with Kris Bilski from Astor Productions, after working together on previous projects, his amazing equipment always blows me away especially with his expertise behind every piece. Having a great team of enthusiastic great people which has been so great to find in Hull has been essential. One of the other benefits is the attention that Hull City of Culture 2017 has brought to the city, even if the Culture team isn’t doing anything for us at all directly, it’s still made everyone just a little bit more switched on and open minded to believing that we can make something happen and get something creative out there. With all the art projects going on at the moment it’s certainly less dismissed than it used to be, for example in 2012 I made a music video in Hull for a local band after just wanting to create something, but just trying to get people to help me on the project was a nightmare, nobody was really interested, everyone was quite dismissive, but now everyone is so down to help you and to get involved with what’s happening as much as possible, jumping at the chance, people are definitely more open to film and the arts. People have banded together to just make some creative stuff happen.

What would you like Northern Fall’s effect to be on Hull and the North?

Well I think first and foremost it’ll prove that independent film makers can progress and develop in Hull from a really ground level with just the right amount of work and hustle. I know that certain films have been shot in hull before, but this full project really is Hull through and through, from the team behind it all being locals and then the locations you see on screen, which just makes it very authentic. It’s something that people won’t have seen before, both visually and in terms of the talent we have here, it’s a really great opportunity we’re taking. Because it’s an independent film it really is authentic, we don’t have a big production company on our back. We have a set budget that we need that when we have that everything is made the way we always wanted to.

Update #2 Jack has gone missing…

Jack has been missing for the past couple of days now… the campaign video is in it’s last week to reach it’s goal and we need your help. The ransom note we got just a few hours ago has said that if the campaign reaches it’s goal Jack will be released, but his health isn’t guaranteed. They sent us a video below of them interrogating him… viewer digression advised.

Update #1 New Poster!

The ‘Northern Fall’ team would like to say a massive THANK YOU to everybody who has already contributed towards this exciting film. We really appreciate it! New perks and investment opportunities coming very soon! We’re about to really shift into full throttle with content and special events to help make the project happen so be sure to keep up to date to everything that’s happening.

Get ready for a brand new teaser dropping later this week!

Check out our new poster below!

GET IN TOUCH

If you want to see this project come to life, please don’t hesitate and get involved either by donating what you can to the link on the right, getting in touch below and especially sharing the Indie GoGo campaign wherever you can. Every bit of help we can get with the campaign is appreciated to help make this project happen. We can’t wait to show you more.

12 + 14 =

WELCOME TO THE NORTH

Whilst out walking his dog, Joe discovers an unconscious woman out in the woods. He takes her back to his place and she comes around claiming she can’t remember anything. Joe’s intrigue for the woman grows out of the circumstances he found her in and he sets out to protect her when a couple of heavies turn up asking questions. Add some bent cops and a heap of hallucinogenics into the mix and you’ve got a violent, comic tale of crime and survival.

DARK, GRITTY AND MYSTERIOUS 

Jack Grewar, Director/Writer

My ambition for Northern Fall is to create a dark and mysterious environment in which the characters, each holding their own secrets and motivations, ultimately clash, leading to an exciting climax. Thematically it’s explores masculinity and the similarities and differences between men in a world of crime and obsession. Each character is pursuing either money, morality or both. Visual influences for the movie include the work of David Fincher and Nicolas Winding Refn.

PRODUCTION TEAM

ASTOR PRODUCTIONS

ASTOR PRODUCTIONS

Production Team

Kris Bilski is the director of local film production company Astor Productions. Astor provide unrivalled technical support from cinematography, sound, editing and visual effects.

JACK GREWAR

JACK GREWAR

Writer/Director

Is a film maker from Hull. After studying film in the USA, he returned to Hull and assembled a team of creatives to start work on his screenplay ‘Northern Fall’ Jack’s last short film ‘Revolt’ is currently on the film festival circuit.

MONIQUE NAGRA

MONIQUE NAGRA

Picturehouse26 / Producer

Is an awards nominated film maker from Hull. On completion of film studies in London, Monique returned to Hull & established Picturehouse 26. Her last short film ‘Chester’ has been nominated for best short film at The Anchorage International Film Festival, The Fargo Film Festival & The L.A International Women’s Film Festival.

DONATION PERKS

UPDATES

An Interview with Hull Film Maker, Jack Grewar

An Interview with Hull Film Maker, Jack Grewar

Tell me about your time in the New York film school?

So in 2011, after being a film buff for so long of course meant that I’d always read Empire magazine, which had this full page ad every month dedicated to the New York film academy, I’d always just skim passed it, but one day by chance on my lunch break whilst I was working on a script I must have just read the full advert, realising what it actually was whilst I was, after reading that I just kind of thought “screw it” I had no major ties at the time holding me back, no massive commitments and just made it happen, that day I applied to the email address at the bottom which got the ball rolling, then 18 months and lots of money and paper work later, I was there.

What was the biggest thing that you took away from that process?

I realised that it really was something I wanted to do for the rest of my life. At first it was all new and overwhelming, not knowing quite what you’re doing, but you pick things up from people from all their different skill levels, but one thing that I really took away from it was that there’s so many ways things can get done, but all that matters at the end of the day is to tell the best story that you possibly can and it’s just about making that happen with whatever resources you have at the time to do it. I worked with a few different crews and teams and it really is just applying your own style and methods to things and nurturing others too really.

What is the story of Northern Fall, how did the project start?

 I made a short film in 2016 called Revolt, during the making of that film I met a bunch of super talented people, cast and crew, which included Kris Bilski from Astor Productions, Monique Nagra, an actor called Claudia Soyer, a great bunch of people, and after working with them on revolt and working well together I started getting ideas for a feature film obviously whilst I was out shooting in Hull I was getting ideas and these great specific locations during that shoot I was getting inspiration for another story. It’s in the same vein as it’s a crime thriller, and it was at that point when I started the ball rolling, shortly after editing revolt I started writing the script, which itself is inspired by Coen brothers, it’s got ideas of dark noir, darkly comic and in the vein of Fargo.

How did you get into the mind-set for something like that?

I guess in the past I’ve just watched a lot of crime thrillers, it’s my favourite genre of film, so, I just find the whole genre has so much scope to be cinematic and entertaining, the film Se7en for example, the film Fargo, Fight club, these dark atmospheric gritty thrillers, to me they have a lot more cinematic qualities than a comedy for example, I just love.

Making a film that just entertains people was always the bottom line for me really, that’s why people watch movies at the end of the day. A lot of films these days are getting more caught up in trying to be philosophical than anything else, if I can just get the audience to watch it to the end I think I’ll have succeeded and have a great time along the way taking a trip to the North.

The film itself creates a dark violent world. There are still underlying themes of course as with any great story. Northern Fall can really be summarised by the idea of how addiction and obsession can either churn you out in one piece or destroyed and the mental struggle that they go through. There isn’t really a stereotypical lead and a stereotypical bad guy in this movie with all its characters, I think everyone is in the middle caught up in their obsessions, whether it’s affluence or morality and the story is about how far they’ll go to get what they want.

What were the inspirations for the film?

I guess one of the characters, the lead male Joe, I really wanted to create an antihero, he’s got a dark past but remains a family man, he’s a good bloke but he’s done bad things in his time with still the possibility of him going back to prison. He leads this life of crime but his motivations lie with his daughter and less for greed. Once he meets the lead character of Erica he becomes almost obsessed with her, there’s a real passion between the two, dancing on a fine line. In terms of style my films are visually influenced by the work of Michael Mann, David Fincher and Nicolas Winding Refn, with my some of my top films being ’Heat’, ’Fight Club’ and ’The Neon Demon’

Music is a massive inspiration, I create a soundtrack for each movie during the writing process, which is then shared with the production crew and cast to establish the tone. Massive Attack, Portishead, The Dead Weather and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club have been the recent inspirations for story and character developments.

Is Joe someone who you’d daydream about being?

I guess so yeah, he’s a man’s man, he’s the kind of guy you want to be. In terms of references Ryan Gosling’s character in Drive being that perfect silent but deadly type, he’s cool, good looking, he can say a thousand things with just one look, but you know he cares for this woman and child, but still just has something underneath him, that violence that will occasionally show itself with these outbursts. Again, just the idea of that antihero.

What have been the hardest points for you int terms of the writing process? Especially in Hull where it’s certainly not been done before?

So, I guess I started with the location of Hull which I always knew I was going to be setting it in, which immediately gave me so much inspiration for. It’s just so great for shooting with its mixture of interesting urban and rural locations, I love rural locations like forests that suits this style, it’s a nice contrast for the characters to be so isolated in the woods where they should be feeling more open and then suddenly feel more freedom when they’re back in the city, just showing the kind of environment that these characters thrive in. Location plays a major part in the film, whilst using the vibrancy of Hull to add another dynamic.

Because Hull is quite tight knit I know quite a lot of people who own bars and great locations that would let me shoot in. The campaign combined with other fundraising events have raised a few grand of our 25K budget. Right now, we’re approaching local businesses in Hull with investment and sponsorship opportunities. We’ve already made arrangements with local bars, clubs, restaurants, factories and food stores for the shoot.

How do you want the audience to come out of the film? What kind of emotions can you expect them to come through

There’s an intensity to the film, but I really want the audience to develop almost a relationship to the characters that kind of reflect themselves in some way or another, I believe everyone will empathise with at least one of the characters as each one of them kind of whispers and tugs at everyone’s individual darker sides.

What have you thought about the process so far about starting a short film in hull?

 From my own personal experience the worst sort of semi mistake I’ve made so far is not obtaining the right permissions to film in certain places. I’m all for guerrilla and indie film making, I like finding those rustic warehouses to shoot in for authenticity. But on one occasion the police turned up because of a member of public turning up after seeing a firearm and panicking, even though it was just a replica for the sake of the shoot, fortunately it was the last shot of the day but I thought to myself it would have ruined the shoot and cost even more money. But even then, that mistake ended up being great for the project as it got some great publicity in the news so it worked in that manner but I would say it’s all about planning with this sort of thing, preparation is key, and factoring in a buffer zone for any mistakes that might have been made, back up plans for back up plans and be able to make decisions on the spot.

 

What kind of risks have you taken with pursuing Northern Fall?

To be honest I’m anxious about everything! Because it’s a feature there’s that many elements to it it’s almost like where you begin, the full project of northern fall is going to involve 70 people cast and crew, and with being director, producer and writer I’ll be touching and deciding on every factor. I try not to over think it because you can just end up having a heart attack and have decision paralysis. It’s just about doing something that gets you step by step even further towards completion and getting yourself out there.

What’s been the most beneficial so far in the process in terms of speeding up the process or making it easier for you?

First, I would say that because I had already made Revolt in 2016 the cast and crew I assembled on that project worked so well together, I knew that I could use everyone on that project on Northern Fall which got the ball rolling. The relationship I’ve developed with Kris Bilski from Astor Productions, after working together on previous projects, his amazing equipment always blows me away especially with his expertise behind every piece. Having a great team of enthusiastic great people which has been so great to find in Hull has been essential. One of the other benefits is the attention that Hull City of Culture 2017 has brought to the city, even if the Culture team isn’t doing anything for us at all directly, it’s still made everyone just a little bit more switched on and open minded to believing that we can make something happen and get something creative out there. With all the art projects going on at the moment it’s certainly less dismissed than it used to be, for example in 2012 I made a music video in Hull for a local band after just wanting to create something, but just trying to get people to help me on the project was a nightmare, nobody was really interested, everyone was quite dismissive, but now everyone is so down to help you and to get involved with what’s happening as much as possible, jumping at the chance, people are definitely more open to film and the arts. People have banded together to just make some creative stuff happen.

What would you like Northern Fall’s effect to be on Hull and the North?

Well I think first and foremost it’ll prove that independent film makers can progress and develop in Hull from a really ground level with just the right amount of work and hustle. I know that certain films have been shot in hull before, but this full project really is Hull through and through, from the team behind it all being locals and then the locations you see on screen, which just makes it very authentic. It’s something that people won’t have seen before, both visually and in terms of the talent we have here, it’s a really great opportunity we’re taking. Because it’s an independent film it really is authentic, we don’t have a big production company on our back. We have a set budget that we need that when we have that everything is made the way we always wanted to.

Update #2 Jack has gone missing…

Jack has been missing for the past couple of days now… the campaign video is in it’s last week to reach it’s goal and we need your help. The ransom note we got just a few hours ago has said that if the campaign reaches it’s goal Jack will be released, but his health isn’t guaranteed. They sent us a video below of them interrogating him… viewer digression advised.

Update #1 New Poster!

The ‘Northern Fall’ team would like to say a massive THANK YOU to everybody who has already contributed towards this exciting film. We really appreciate it! New perks and investment opportunities coming very soon! We’re about to really shift into full throttle with content and special events to help make the project happen so be sure to keep up to date to everything that’s happening.

Get ready for a brand new teaser dropping later this week!

Check out our new poster below!

GET IN TOUCH

If you want to see this project come to life, please don’t hesitate and get involved either by donating what you can to the link on the right, getting in touch below and especially sharing the Indie GoGo campaign wherever you can. Every bit of help we can get with the campaign is appreciated to help make this project happen. We can’t wait to show you more.

13 + 1 =